Original Article

Should we consider obesity a risk factor for pelvic organ prolapse?

  • BALINT FARKAS
  • PETRA GAL
  • SANDOR RACZ
  • PETER TAMAS
  • NELLI FARKAS
  • ZOLTAN NEMETH

Pelviperineology 2016;35(4):104-107

Objective:

Obesity is a growing worldwide epidemic, with increasing prevalence in both children and adults. Although several publications and books describe obesity as a major risk factor of pelvic organ prolapse (POP), we assumed that obesity might not be a predisposing factor of symptomatic stage II or higher POP.

Methods:

In a prospective cohort study, 1911 women suffering from symptomatic POP were included. Their data was compared to 1995 age, and parity matching women, with no prolapse as control, from January 2009 to December 2016. Obesity was determined by calculating the body mass index (BMI). Detailed medical history and standard demographic data were revealed, and analysed using multivariate analysis.

Results:

The average age was 56 years ± 13 SD (min: 22, max: 89), and the mean parity was 2.04 ± 0.95 SD per patient (min: 0, max: 13). The study population had average weight and height, resulting in a mean BMI of 26.69 ± 4.45 kg/m2 compared to the control group BMI 26.85 ± 5.56 kg/m2. Two third (66.6 %) of the study population were in postmenopause with an average BMI of 27.14 ± 4.31 kg/m2, while in premenopausal patients (33.4%) the BMI was found to be 25.78 ± 4.60 kg/m2 respectively (p = 0.042). Multivariate analysis revealed no statistical significant difference between POP and control groups (p = 0.146).

Conclusion:

We emphasize that in our homogenous Caucasian Eastern-European population obesity might not act as a strong risk factor for symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse stage 2 or higher.

Keywords: Pelvic organ prolapse; Obesity; Risk factor.