Full Issue March 2009 Complete Issue read_pdf [2.3 Mb]

March 2009 Complete Issue
The Complete Pelviperineology March 2009 Issue in PDF format
. [PDF]


read_pdfPdf
Editorial Editorial

Cover pelviperineologyMarch 2009 marks an important step in the development of this journal. We are pleased to announce a significant expansion of our editorial board with new contributors from the various specialties, reflecting our multidisciplinary nature. With our new editorial board the journal will have the resources to have regular contributions in the fields of Imaging, Anatomy, the Integral Theory as well as existing features of the European Perineology Group and the Pelvic Floor Digest. [More]

ReadFull Text read_pdfPdf
Editorial Can pelvic floor ultrasonography “imagine” the future?

pelvic floor ultrasonographyPelvic floor disorders (PFD) include urinary and fecal incontinence, overactive bladder, constipation, pelvic pain and pelvic organ prolapse. These conditions are often assumed to be attributable to the effects of pregnancy and childbirth. It is still questionable whether pregnancy itself is a risk factor for PFD in later life or if it is the vaginal delivery that is the main risk factor. Pelvic floor laxity as a consequence of childbirth may result from weakening and stretching of the muscles and connective tissue during delivery or it may occur as result of spontaneous lacerations and episiotomies during delivery. Both can lead to impairment of the position and support of the pelvic organs. [More]

ReadFull Text read_pdfPdf
Classification System Complications of vaginal supportive implants for prolapse surgery. New complications, new symptomatology, prevention and treatment by Michel Cosson et al.

vaginal supportive implants for prolapse surgeryVaginal placement of synthetic meshes has become more and more popular for the treatment of genital prolapse. Recently many companies have commercialized some specific devices for this particular route. The term of meshes is probably inadequate as many devices are actually biological or both synthetic and biological. We will use here the term of vaginal supportive implants to address these material in their specific use for prolapse and incontinence surgery by thee vaginal route. These meshes have been originally designed to be used in hernia abdominal surgery, and recently the success and good tolerance of sub urethral slings have encouraged their use by the vaginal route.  [More]

ReadFull Text read_pdfPdf
Case ReportIntestinal and pelvic endometriosis: psychological and surgical considerations by V. Podzemny et al.

endometriosis Endometriosis occurs in women of reproductive age and is most commonly found on the peritoneal surface of the reproductive organs. The prevalence of the disease in the general population ranges between 1 and 8% according to different series.1 The intestine is affected in less than 20% of patients suffering from gynaecological endometriosis. In the rectosigmoid colon, endometriosis may mimic either a neoplasm or inflammatory bowel disease and may even cause intestinal obstruction. Nearly half of the patients with endometriosis suffer from infertility due to hormonal defects. The hormonal treatment of the disease prevents pregnancy. This problem, together with symptoms, such as severe pelvic pain, may affect the patient’s quality of life and cause mental illness. [More]

ReadFull Text read_pdfPdf
Original Article The use of flow equation in functional coloproctology: a new theory in anorectal physiology by A. Farag

Flo equation The anorectum is a physiologically highly integrated segment of the bowel. The mechanical factors modified by sensory and reflex components are integrated instantaneously in order to initiate normal defecation within a few seconds and to maintain continence within a fraction of a second. This highly integrated nature may be responsible for the lack of answers to the enigmatic question of how the anal sphincter works. This enigma exists despite the availability of an enormous pool of research data where many different factors have been considered in an unintegrated approach. [More]

ReadFull Text read_pdfPdf
Original Article Differential staged sacral reflexes allow a localization of pudendal neuralgia by J.P. Spinosa et al.

Flo equation Compressive pudendal neuropathy is a frequent condition that is often ignored. Its incidence is approximately 1% in the general population and the condition probably affects women more often than men. Because healthcare professionals lack an adequate method to diagnose accurately pudendal neuropathy, the affected individuals often embark on an endless quest for effective relief with serious physical and psychological consequences. There are several possibilities of a treatment to diminish pain. The first line is conservatory followed by infiltrations and, ultimately by surgical procedures. It is therefore important to identify precisely the site where the nerve is compressed. [More]

ReadFull Text read_pdfPdf
Author's Reply A new theory of anorectal function (D. Chatoor, A. Emmanuel) - Issue 4, 2008 by P. Petros, M. Swash .

Flo equation We have been interested to study Drs Chatoor and Emanuel’s analysis and comments on our work. We note that they do not comment overall on the musculo-elastic theory itself, or on the concepts underlying our series of publications. As we explained in the preamble we sought to test the musculo-elastic theory of pelvic function and continence by challenging its predictions, a method proposed as the basis of the scientific method by the late Sir Karl Popper, and regarded as the most rigorous test procedure. Thus the studies we reported were designed to test the musculo-elastic theory by seeking direct tests that would refute the theory. [More]

ReadFull Text read_pdfPdf
Pelvic Floor Digest March 2009 Issue Pelvic Floor Digest read_pdf [262 kb]

pelvic floor digestThis section presents a small sample of the Pelvic Floor Digest (December 2008), an online publication (www.pelvicfloordigest.org) that reproduces titles and abstracts from over 200 journals. The goal is to increase interest in all the compartments of the pelvic floor and to develop an interdisciplinary culture in the reader. [PDF]

read_pdfPdf